AJIC Issue 27, 2021

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    AJIC Issue 27, 2021 - Full Issue
    (LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, 2021-05-31)
    Articles on problematic internet use (PIU), Indigenous knowledge in vocational education, machine learning, scaling of innovation, institutional isomorphism, human–computer interaction for development (HCI4D), and scholarly publishing.
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    AJIC Issue 27, 2021 - Full Issue - print-on-demand version
    (LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, 2021-05-31)
    Articles on problematic internet use (PIU), Indigenous knowledge in vocational education, machine learning, scaling of innovation, institutional isomorphism, human–computer interaction for development (HCI4D), and scholarly publishing.
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    Problematic Internet Use (PIU) Among Adolescents during COVID-19 Lockdown: A Study of High School Students in Ibadan, Nigeria
    (LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, 2021-05-31) Ilesanmi, Olayinka Stephen; Afolabi, Aanuoluwapo Adeyimika; Adebayo, Ayodeji Matthew
    Problematic internet use (PIU) has generally been strongly associated with depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, especially among adolescents, with resulting consequences for their health. This study explores the pattern of internet use, and the prevalence of PIU before and during the COVID-19 lockdown, as well as the causes, effects, and potential mitigation measures in respect of PIU during the lockdown, among high school students in Ibadan, Nigeria. A structured questionnaire, including a 20-question internet addiction test (IAT), was administered during the COVID-19 lockdown to 440 adolescents enrolled in high schools. Of these adolescents, 7.7% appeared from their responses to have had PIU before the COVID-19 lockdown period. However, 64.3% of respondents appeared from their responses to have had PIU during the COVID-19 lockdown period. The main reasons for the increased PIU were boredom, loneliness, idleness, pleasure gained from internet use, physical isolation, and the need for information and communication. The effects of PIU reported among the adolescents included reduced family intimacy, poor academic performance, loss of concentration, as well as internet abuse and risky sexual behaviour. To mitigate PIU among high school students, parental monitoring of adolescents, and their internet access and use, should be promoted. In addition, programmes should be organised by the media and academic institutions to keep adolescents engaged in productive tasks.
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    Indigenous Knowledge and Vocational Education: Marginalisation of Traditional Medicinal Treatments in Rwandan TVET Animal Health Courses
    (LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, 2021-05-31) Ezeanya-Esiobu, Chika; Oguamanam, Chidi; Ndungutse, Vedaste
    This study explores Rwandan ethno-veterinary knowledge and the degree to which this knowledge is reflected in the country’s technical and vocational education and training (TVET) instruction. The knowledge considered is the Indigenous medicinal knowledge used by rural Rwandan livestock farmers to treat their cattle. Through interviews with farmers, TVET graduates and TVET teachers, and an examination of the current TVET Animal Health curriculum, the research identifies a neglect of Indigenous knowledge in the curriculum, despite the fact that local farmers use numerous Indigenous medicinal innovations to treat their animals. The focus of the Rwanda’s TVET Animal Health curriculum is on Western-origin modern veterinary practices. The authors argue that this leaves Rwandan TVET Animal Health graduates unprepared for optimal engagement with rural farmers and with the full range of potential treatments.
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    Reviewing a Decade of Human–Computer Interaction for Development (HCI4D) Research, as One of Best’s “Grand Challenges”
    (LINK Centre, University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), Johannesburg, 2021-05-31) Van Biljon, Judy; Renaud, Karen
    The human–computer interaction for development (HCI4D) field emerged at the intersection of the fields of information and communication technology for development (ICT4D) and human–computer interaction (HCI). In 2010, Michael Best nominated HCI4D as one of ICT4D’s “grand challenges”. This HCI4D field is now entering its second decade, and it is important to reflect on the research that has been conducted, and to consider how HCI4D researchers have addressed the challenge that constitutes the raison d’être of HCI4D’s existence. Best provided four guidelines to inform researchers embracing this challenge. This study commences by identifying the primary HCI4D-specific themes, and then carries out a systematic literature review of the HCI4D literature to build a corpus to support the analysis. The corpus is analysed to reflect on how well the field’s practices align with Best’s guidelines. The overall finding is that HCI4D researchers have largely been following Best’s guidelines and that the HCI4D field is demonstrating encouraging signs of emerging maturity.