Oxygen isotopes suggest elevated thermometabolism within multiple permo-triassic therapsid clades

dc.citation.doi10.7554/eLife.28589en_ZA
dc.contributor.authorRey, K.
dc.contributor.authorAmiot, R.
dc.contributor.authorFourel, F.
dc.contributor.authorAbdala, F.
dc.contributor.authorFluteau, F.
dc.contributor.authorJalil, N.-E.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, J.
dc.contributor.authorRubidge, B.S.
dc.contributor.authorSmith, R.M.H.
dc.contributor.authorSteyer, J.S.
dc.contributor.authorViglietti, P.A.
dc.contributor.authorWang, X.
dc.contributor.authorLécuyer, C.
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-02T13:10:16Z
dc.date.available2017-11-02T13:10:16Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.description.abstractThe only true living endothermic vertebrates are birds and mammals, which produce and regulate their internal temperature quite independently from their surroundings. For mammal ancestors, anatomical clues suggest that endothermy originated during the Permian or Triassic. Here we investigate the origin of mammalian thermoregulation by analysing apatite stable oxygen isotope compositions (d18Op) of some of their Permo-Triassic therapsid relatives. Comparing of the d18Op values of therapsid bone and tooth apatites to those of co-existing non-therapsid tetrapods, demonstrates different body temperatures and thermoregulatory strategies. It is proposed that cynodonts and dicynodonts independently acquired constant elevated thermometabolism, respectively within the Eucynodontia and Lystrosauridae + Kannemeyeriiformes clades. We conclude that mammalian endothermy originated in the Epicynodontia during the middle-late Permian. Major global climatic and environmental fluctuations were the most likely selective pressures on the success of such elevated thermometabolism.en_ZA
dc.description.librarianEM2017en_ZA
dc.identifier.citationRey, K. et al. 2017. Oxygen isotopes suggest elevated thermometabolism within multiple permo-triassic therapsid clades. eLife 6, Article number e28589.en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn2050-084X (Online)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10539/23362
dc.journal.titleeLIFEen_ZA
dc.journal.volume6en_ZA
dc.language.isoenen_ZA
dc.publishereLife Sciences Publications Ltden_ZA
dc.rights© 2017, Rey, K. et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en_ZA
dc.subjectOxygenen_ZA
dc.subjectAnion exchangeen_ZA
dc.subjectAnteosaurusen_ZA
dc.subjectArticleen_ZA
dc.subjectBiostratigraphyen_ZA
dc.subjectCladisticsen_ZA
dc.subjectCriocephalosaurusen_ZA
dc.subjectCynognathusen_ZA
dc.subjectFossilen_ZA
dc.subjectGeochemistryen_ZA
dc.subjectGlanosuchusen_ZA
dc.subjectLesothoen_ZA
dc.subjectMass spectrometryen_ZA
dc.subjectMetabolismen_ZA
dc.subjectMoghreberia nmachouensisen_ZA
dc.subjectNonhumanen_ZA
dc.subjectPaleontologyen_ZA
dc.subjectParacyclotosaurusen_ZA
dc.subjectPermianen_ZA
dc.subjectRadiometric datingen_ZA
dc.subjectStruthiocephalusen_ZA
dc.subjectTaxonomyen_ZA
dc.subjectTetrapoden_ZA
dc.subjectThermometabolismen_ZA
dc.subjectXenotosuchusen_ZA
dc.titleOxygen isotopes suggest elevated thermometabolism within multiple permo-triassic therapsid cladesen_ZA
dc.typeArticleen_ZA
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