"The imperial working class makes itself 'white': white labourism in Britain, Australia and South Africa before the first World War"

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dc.contributor.author Hyslop, Jonathan
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-22T12:06:12Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-22T12:06:12Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-22
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8782
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented 11 October, 1999 en_US
dc.description.abstract On the 1st of March, 1914, the biggest British labour demonstration of the early twentieth century flooded into London's Hyde Park in a seven mile long column. Estimates of the size of the crowd ran as high as half a million. The Socialist papers were euphoric: "Never in my long experience of Hyde Park", wrote R. B. Suthers in The Clarion (6 March 1914) "have I seen such countless multitudes pouring into its confines and gathering around the speakers and the platforms. Never have I seen so impressive a crowd, never have I seen so unanimous and earnest a mass meeting". The publication of the engineering workers' union described the gathering as "the greatest and most impressive of its kind that has ever taken place in the heart of the Empire." (ASEMJR, February 1914) en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Institute for Advanced Social Research;ISS 193
dc.subject Working class. Great Britain. History. 20th century en_US
dc.subject Working class. Australia. History. 20th century en_US
dc.subject Working class. South Africa. History. 20th century en_US
dc.title "The imperial working class makes itself 'white': white labourism in Britain, Australia and South Africa before the first World War" en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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