'Christian compounds for girls': church hostels for African women in Johannesburg, 1907-1970.

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dc.contributor.author Gaitskell, Deborah
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-16T12:19:08Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-16T12:19:08Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-16
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8725
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented August, 1977 en_US
dc.description.abstract Compounds in the mining industry gave Rand and Kimberley capitalists a vital means of industrial and police control of their labour force, as well as enabling them “to provide amenities such as recreation and health supervision” (1), no less important for the smooth running of the mines. Local authorities adapted this idea, in open compounds for casual labourers and, as Davenport has noted, 'it was a short step from the municipal compound to the “native hostel”, which became a common feature of municipal locations in the larger centres under the stimulus of the Urban Areas Act of 1923.'(2) This paper examines three hostels for African women which were established in Johannesburg by missionaries of the Anglican and Methodist Churches, and the American Board Mission. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Studies Institute;ISS 152
dc.title 'Christian compounds for girls': church hostels for African women in Johannesburg, 1907-1970. en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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