The social character of secondary industry in South Africa, 1915-1945. (With special reference to the Witwatersrand)

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dc.contributor.author Freund, Bill
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-14T11:10:43Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-14T11:10:43Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-14
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8682
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented 22 April, 1985 en_US
dc.description.abstract There can be little dispute about the significance and historic importance of the rise of South African secondary industry. Nonetheless, and despite the ready availability of general considerations, fundamental aspects of its development have received little attention, if any, in the historical literature. This essay means to call attention to some of those aspects in the earlier phases of South African industrial development ending with the Second World War. The main focus will be on the forms and allocation of labour, an area which has been relatively neglected and the one that allows for an examination of economic changes through the historically specific character of South African society. The distinctive and extremely heterogeneous workforce of the first half of this century in secondary industry stands apart both from sectors of the economy developed earlier and from the industrial labour force structure that would follow. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Studies Institute;ISS 149
dc.subject Labor supply. South Africa. History. 20th century en_US
dc.title The social character of secondary industry in South Africa, 1915-1945. (With special reference to the Witwatersrand) en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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