From Refuge to resistance: Botsabelo, Mafolofolo and Johannes Dinkwanyane: Missionaries and converts under the authority of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek, 1860-1876

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dc.contributor.author Delius, P.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-14T10:54:45Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-14T10:54:45Z
dc.date.issued 2010-09-14
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8664
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented 23 February, 1981 en_US
dc.description.abstract In the 1870s the Transvaal witnessed an intensification of struggles over land and labour. This development was particularly marked in its eastern districts and was partly stimulated by the impact on the local and regional political economy of the discovery and exploitation of diamonds and gold. Also important was the changing nature of Z.A.R. control over, and intervention in, the countryside and the growing power of the Pedi polity. The latter had by the 1870s emerged as an alternative focus of power and authority to both the Z.A.R. and the Swazi kingdom. These factors shaped the disputes which culminated in the war between the Pedi and the Z.A.R. in 1876. This conflict in turn provided one of the pretexts for the British annexation of the Transvaal in early 1877. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries African Studies Institute;ISS 118
dc.title From Refuge to resistance: Botsabelo, Mafolofolo and Johannes Dinkwanyane: Missionaries and converts under the authority of the Zuid-Afrikaansche Republiek, 1860-1876 en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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