Intellectual Property: benefit or burden for Africa?

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dc.contributor.author Nicholson, Denise Rosemary
dc.date.accessioned 2010-09-10T12:20:23Z
dc.date.available 2010-09-10T12:20:23Z
dc.date.issued 2006
dc.identifier.issn 0340-0352
dc.identifier.other 10:1177/0340035206074067
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8643
dc.description.abstract This paper highlights some of the issues affecting access to knowledge in South Africa and other Afrian countries, as well as the implications of international intellectual property agreements, focusing mainly on copyright. It will show that the majority of these countries are struggling to meet th very basic requirement of internatinonal intellectual proeprty agreements, yet some of them are being pressured by developed countries to adopt even stricter intellectual property regimes through the Intellectual Property Chapter or 'TRIPs-Plus' in Free Trade Agreements. The paper highlights the impact of some of the TRIPS-Plus provisions on education, libraries, and people with sensory-disabilities, as well as public health and development in general. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sage Publications on behalf of IFLA en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Vol. 32, no. 4;p. 310-324
dc.subject intellectual property; Africa; copyright; IP; access to knowledge; A2K; Free trade agreements; FTA; TRIPS; TRIPS-Plus; en_US
dc.title Intellectual Property: benefit or burden for Africa? en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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