Uptake of the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission programme at a primary care level in Sedibeng District

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dc.contributor.author Berthet, Emilie
dc.date.accessioned 2009-04-29T09:54:51Z
dc.date.available 2009-04-29T09:54:51Z
dc.date.issued 2009-04-29T09:54:51Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/6911
dc.description.abstract Introduction: Prevention of mother-to-child-transmission of HIV is a priority public health problem in Africa as pregnant women and their children are the most vulnerable. In South Africa, a prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) programme has been implemented in antenatal clinics to reduce paediatric HIV/AIDS. It is necessary to assess the uptake of this programme by pregnant women. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the uptake of the PMTCT programme in the antenatal clinics of Sedibeng district. Using data coming from all the antenatal clinics (ANC) at a primary health care levelin Sedibeng for 2005 and 2006, we determined the proportion of ANC attendees who accepted to be counselled, the proportion of these who accepted to be tested for HIV, the proportion of these who came back for results and the proportion who were HIV positive. Nevirapine (NVP)uptake was determined as well among HIV positive women and babies born to HIV positive women. Methods Data collection was by a record review of PMTCT records from all antenatal clinics in the district. To determine maternal uptake of PMTCT, data were extracted from antenatal clinics monthly collation sheets for 2005 and 2006. Nevirapine uptake for the babies born to HIV positive mothers was determined in one facility: data were v - collected in the midwife obstetric unit of the community health centre from both the Nevirapine register and the mothers’ delivery records. Results A total of 8010 women attended in Sedibeng antenatal clinics in 2005 and 10217 in 2006. In 2005 95 % of attendee women accepted to be counselled among whom 91% accepted to be tested for HIV. In 2006 93% women accepted to be counselled among whom 91% accepted to be tested. Almost all tested women came back for results: 99% came back for results in 2005 and 98% in 2006. The proportion of HIV positive women in the attendees population was 23% in 2005 and 24% in 2006. Nevirapine was dispensed to only 600 per 1000 HIV positive women in 2005 and 539 per 1000 HIV positive women in 2006. From June 2005 to May 2006 only 59% of babies born to an HIV positive mother received NVP. Discussion and conclusion The study showed a good uptake of voluntary counselling and HIV testing in Sedibeng district antenatal clinics. But a low proportion of HIV positive women and HIV-exposed babies received NVP. There was probably a loss of follow up of women between ANC visits and delivery. Nevirapine uptake must be improved in Sedibeng antenatal clinics and further investigations need to be done to understand the factors influencing uptake. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject HIV/AIDS en
dc.subject transmission en
dc.subject mother en
dc.subject child en
dc.title Uptake of the prevention of mother-to-child-transmission programme at a primary care level in Sedibeng District en
dc.type Thesis en


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    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of the Witwatersrand, 1972.

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