Money, conflict and reciprocity in rural black families in South Africa.

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dc.contributor.author Gouveia, Joanne Ailsa
dc.date.accessioned 2009-03-03T09:09:39Z
dc.date.available 2009-03-03T09:09:39Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03-03T09:09:39Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/6601
dc.description.abstract There is a rich body of literature examining multiple aspects of money in the social sciences yet the role of money in organising and shaping family interactions in the South African context appears limited. The aims of this research were to explore money and its link to conflict in the family and develop an understanding of how money is organised in and influenced by culture and gender in rural Black families in South Africa. Ten women undergraduate students were selected, using nonprobability snowball sampling, to participate in individual semi-structured interviews. Detailed biographical information was collected alongside responses to ten open ended money related questions. Interviews were transcribed and thematic content analysis was used to identify and analyse themes in the data both within and across the ten interviews. The research was dominated by five key findings the most significant being a relative lack of conflict between the interviewees’ family members in general and specifically with regard to money. This was influenced by the shared hierarchy of priorities within the family that informs and directs the allocation of resources. The authority of parents related to a particular set of social and cultural norms determined familial interaction influencing the limited expression of conflict. The presence and significance of reciprocity in the interviewees’ families was widely accepted within an extended family structure and exhibited no striking generational differences in adherence to the generalised norm of reciprocity. The interviewees’ families also displayed a marked lack of gendered difference in the allocation of resources among family members. The study while achieving its goal of providing some understanding of how money works in a particular group of rural Black families highlights the need for further exploration of money and conflict in the family in the South African context. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Money en
dc.subject Conflict en
dc.subject Reciprocity en
dc.subject Family en
dc.subject South Africa en
dc.title Money, conflict and reciprocity in rural black families in South Africa. en
dc.type Thesis en


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