Studies towards the development of Salmonella-specific bacteriophages for sanitation in the food industry

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dc.contributor.author Hobbs, Angela
dc.date.accessioned 2008-03-18T08:18:32Z
dc.date.available 2008-03-18T08:18:32Z
dc.date.issued 2008-03-18T08:18:32Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/4674
dc.description.abstract ABSTRACT Bacteriophages have sparked interest as novel ways to control foodborne pathogens. The application of Salmonella-specific phages as antimicrobial agents was tested against relevant Salmonella isolates of poultry origin. Two different Salmonella-specific phages, A and C, were isolated from enriched sewage. They displayed differences in their host-range but exhibited virulent behaviour towards Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ATCC 13311. Toxicity studies were conducted with individual and combined applications of phages A and C, at an MOI of 1, on Salmonella ATCC 13311. Following 3 hour exposure, both applications were equally effective at reducing Salmonella by approximately 1 x 105 CFU/ml. Similar toxicity profiles were observed with both applications, however, a delay occurred with phage A. We propose that phages A and C have similar infective specificities and that during combination competition for the receptor is overcome by phage C. Neither application eliminated Salmonella to undetectable levels. The presence of phage-resistant mutants is a fundamental issue that will hamper the use of phages as alternate antimicrobial agents. en
dc.format.extent 1548975 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Salmonella en
dc.subject Bacteriophages en
dc.title Studies towards the development of Salmonella-specific bacteriophages for sanitation in the food industry en
dc.type Thesis en


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    Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of the Witwatersrand, 1972.

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