Gender social networks and income generation among Congolese migrants in Johannesburg

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dc.contributor.author Monche, Felix
dc.date.accessioned 2007-02-16T13:29:22Z
dc.date.available 2007-02-16T13:29:22Z
dc.date.issued 2007-02-16T13:29:22Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/2041
dc.description Student Number : 0517437P - MA dissertation - Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences - Faculty of Humanities en
dc.description.abstract A significant number of refugees and asylum seekers are living in urban areas in developing countries. In addition to the fact that they receive little assistance from international organizations, host government policies represent obstacles to their livelihoods. Generally, the economic behaviour, reasons for migrating and experiences of female migrants often differ from those of male. This research report examines the impact of gender on social networks and how gender might influence access to income. In contrast to other studies on social networks that focus on the social relationships between individuals and communities located in sending and receiving societies, this study produces greater understanding of urban migrants’ livelihoods by exploring how women use social networks to generate income and contrasting these with those of men. This is rooted in the assumption that women refugees are facing additional challenges to livelihood including their social responsibilities and job stereotyping. To document how gender might influence social networks and access to income, qualitative data collected through semi structured, face-to-face, in-depth interviews among Congolese refugees in Johannesburg was used. Findings reveal that gender does not have impact on the nature of social networks used by Congolese men and women to facilitate their access to income generating activities. However, friendships and social relations among Congolese refugees are based on gender and as a result Congolese refugees may be channelled in gender-dominated occupations. Congolese women are facing specific challenges such as domestic labour and child care that may limit their access to jobs and businesses. en
dc.format.extent 257531 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject gender en
dc.subject social networks en
dc.subject income generating activities en
dc.subject social capital en
dc.subject migration en
dc.title Gender social networks and income generation among Congolese migrants in Johannesburg en
dc.type Thesis en


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