Comparative ethnoentomology of edible stinkbugs in southern Africa and sustainable management considerations

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dc.contributor.author Catherine Maria Dzerefos, C.M.
dc.contributor.author Witkowski, E.T.F.
dc.contributor.author Toms, R.
dc.date.accessioned 2016-05-19T10:18:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-05-19T10:18:48Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.citation Dzerefos, C.M., Witkowski, E.T.F., Toms, R. 2013. Comparative ethnoentomology of edible stinkbugs in southern Africa and sustainable management considerations. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 9(1) en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1746-4269
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/20391
dc.description.abstract Insects, such as stinkbugs, are able to produce noxious defence chemicals to ward off predators, nevertheless, some ethnic groups have recipes to render them delicious. We provide an example of edible stinkbugs (Encosternum delegorguei) used by two locally separate ethnic groups in South Africa, the Vhavenda and Mapulana, with a third group, the Bolobedu using them for commercial purposes. Structured interview schedules and observations with 106 harvesters were conducted to determine differences in use, nomenclature and oral history, methods of collection and preparation as well as perceptions pertaining to availability. The stinkbugs’ foul defence chemical and flight response necessitates nocturnal harvesting when the insect is immobilised by cold. The defence chemical stains the skin and affects vision yet protective gear is not worn. Damage to host trees was recorded when harvesters poached from plantations or private land, whereas, in communal-lands, sustainable methods were preferred. The legitimisation of stinkbug harvesting and introduction of a collection funnel could reduce conflicts with managers of plantations and private land. Two methods to remove the defence chemical for increased palatability were used. Preparation methods differed in whether or not water was used and also whether the head was left intact or removed. Stinkbugs have numerous medicinal uses, in particular as a hangover cure. Awareness and optimal use of beneficial insects, such as stinkbugs, in rural areas could lead to a reconsideration of current environmental management strategies, where harvesters act as habitat stewards and clearing, grazing or burning indigenous vegetation is kept to a minimum. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher BioMed Central en_ZA
dc.subject Edible insects en_ZA
dc.subject Entomophagy en_ZA
dc.subject Ethnomedicine en_ZA
dc.subject Sustainable harvesting en_ZA
dc.subject Traditional food en_ZA
dc.subject Hexapoda en_ZA
dc.subject Southern en_ZA
dc.subject Defence chemical en_ZA
dc.subject Animals en_ZA
dc.subject Conservation of Natural Resources en_ZA
dc.subject Ecosystem en_ZA
dc.subject Food en_ZA
dc.subject Heteroptera en_ZA
dc.subject Medicine en_ZA
dc.subject Traditional en_ZA
dc.subject Terminology as Topic en_ZA
dc.subject Africa en_ZA
dc.title Comparative ethnoentomology of edible stinkbugs in southern Africa and sustainable management considerations en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA


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