District Nine and constructions of other: Implications for heterogeneous classrooms.

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dc.contributor.author Janks, Hilary
dc.contributor.author Adegoke, Roseline
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-24T09:37:35Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-24T09:37:35Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Janks, H., & Adegoke, R. (2011). District Nine and constructions of other: Implications for heterogeneous classrooms. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, 10(2), 39-48. en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 1175-8708
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/18121
dc.description.abstract Culturally responsive research and pedagogy are a challenge in classrooms that are increasingly heterogeneous. I start from the premise that culture is dynamic not static, that difference is a resource for new ways of doing, thinking and believing, that identity is hybrid. The challenge for teachers is how to harness the productive potential of diverse classrooms for pedagogy. John Thompson (1990) argues that discourses of “unification” which construct an “us”, and discourses of “fragmentation” which construct a “them”, produce and maintain relations of power. Us/them discourse will be explored in the South African context in relation to both apartheid’s racial othering and post-apartheid’s xenophobic othering. The South African film, District Nine, which can be interpreted as both forms of othering, is presented as a case for considering these ideas. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject Culturally responsive pedagogy en_ZA
dc.subject Othering en_ZA
dc.subject Relations of power en_ZA
dc.subject Critical literacy en_ZA
dc.title District Nine and constructions of other: Implications for heterogeneous classrooms.
dc.type Article en_ZA


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