The morality of current minimum wage laws in the clothing and textile industry in South Africa today

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dc.contributor.author Stephenson, Rosalind
dc.date.accessioned 2012-10-04T11:07:09Z
dc.date.available 2012-10-04T11:07:09Z
dc.date.issued 2012-10-04
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/12047
dc.description M.A. University of the Witwatersrand, Faculty of Humanities (Applied Ethics for Professionals), 2012 en_ZA
dc.description.abstract In this research report I question whether the minimum wage laws as applied in the clothing and textile industry in South Africa today are morally justified. In answering the question, I examine the moral justification for minimum wage laws in general, namely the alleviation of poverty and the prevention of exploitation. I argue that in order for minimum wage laws in general to be morally justified they must meet certain criteria. I identify and discuss five criteria. I then apply these criteria to the minimum wage laws in the clothing and textile industry is South Africa. I argue that the laws do not meet these criteria fully and that they need to be amended in order for them to be morally justified. I then make some recommendations as to how they could be amended. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.title The morality of current minimum wage laws in the clothing and textile industry in South Africa today en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA


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