An investigation of two different modalities of language used in an educational setting and the behaviour of deaf learners.

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dc.contributor.author Swanepoel, Brandon
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-06T06:38:09Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-06T06:38:09Z
dc.date.issued 2012-09-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/11898
dc.description.abstract Research conducted on the prevalence of behavioural adjustment in Deaf children and adolescents, in erstwhile countries, points towards an appreciably elevated percentage of emotional and behavioural problems amongst this population group when compared to hearing normative groups. Studies specify that the prevalence of behaviour and emotional problems in Deaf children and adolescents varies from 4.8% to 50.3%. From existing research conducted, it is ambiguous as to why the reported prevalence rates of maladjustment are higher amongst Deaf children and adolescents. This pioneering study is the first of its kind to research dissimilar modalities of language used as the language of learning and teaching (LoLT) in schools for Deaf learners and how this could possibly correlate to learner behaviour in the classroom. Taking into consideration the reported pervasiveness of maladjustment in Deaf children and adolescents; this study uses the Teacher Report Form (TRF) to investigate the types of behaviour problems displayed by Deaf learners in the classroom. It further investigates whether Deaf learners display certain types of behaviour problems when dissimilar modalities of language are used as the language of learning and teaching. The overall findings of this study suggest that teachers who use manually coded spoken language report an elevated prevalence of behaviour problems on the TRF compared to teachers who use South African Sign Language (SASL). Results further suggest that the group of teachers who use SASL report somatic complaints and attention problems as the most frequently encountered behaviour problems in their classrooms. In comparison the group of teachers who use manually coded spoken English (MCE) report social problems and attention problems as the most frequently encountered behaviour problems in their classrooms. Limitations of this study and suggestions for future research are discussed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject Adjustment disorders en_ZA
dc.subject Deaf en_ZA
dc.subject Disruptive behaviour disorders en_ZA
dc.subject Manually Coded Spoken Language en_ZA
dc.subject South African Sign Language (SASL) en_ZA
dc.subject Teacher Report Form (TRF) en_ZA
dc.title An investigation of two different modalities of language used in an educational setting and the behaviour of deaf learners. en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA


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