Modelling the cooling of concrete by piped water

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dc.contributor.author Myers, T.G.
dc.contributor.author Fowkes, N.D.
dc.contributor.author Ballim, Y.
dc.date.accessioned 2012-01-30T08:45:46Z
dc.date.available 2012-01-30T08:45:46Z
dc.date.issued 2009-03-25
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/11189
dc.description Large concrete structures are usually made sequentially in a series of blocks. After each block is poured it must be left to cool and shrink for a period depending on its size, but typically for around 1 week, before the next block is poured. The reason for the delay is that the mixture of cement and water, which constitute the binding agent of the concrete, results in a series of hydration reactions that generate heat. en_US
dc.description.abstract The chemical reaction can lead to temperature rises in excess of 50 K and it can take a number of years before the concrete cools to the ambient temperature. Prior to construction of the Hoover dam engineers at the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation estimated that if the dam were built in a single continuous pour the concrete would require 125 years to cool to the ambient temperature and that the resulting stresses would have caused the dam to crack and fail (U.S. Bureau of Reclamation 2005). en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Drying en_US
dc.subject Temperature en_US
dc.subject Modelling en_US
dc.title Modelling the cooling of concrete by piped water en_US


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