Toxic leadership, psychological capital and individual outcomes

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dc.contributor.author Crozet, Kate
dc.date.accessioned 2020-11-09T11:46:31Z
dc.date.available 2020-11-09T11:46:31Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/30115
dc.description A research report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts by Coursework and Research Report in the field of Organisational Psychology in the Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg on 17 February 2020. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Many studies have investigated the effects of Toxic Leadership (TL) as a form of job stress and have found TL to negatively impact on an employee’s wellbeing. The negative effects of TL can manifest in physiological symptoms such as headaches, increased blood pressure and insomnia, as well as in psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and lowered self-esteem. This study aimed to explore TL and its effects on two individual outcomes: physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing. Drawing on Lazarus and Folkman’s Transactional Model of Stress and Coping and Hobfoll’s Conservation of Resources Model, this study also aimed to explore the buffering effect of Psychological Capital (PsyCap) on the relationships between TL and physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing. Participants accessed the survey online, and completed five questionnaires, namely; a Self-Developed Demographic Questionnaire, Schmidt’s Toxic Leadership Scale, the Psychological Capital Questionnaire, the Physical Health Questionnaire, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. This resulted in a sample of 140 full-time employees from various industries within South Africa. Results of the study indicated that TL was significantly correlated with both physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing, and simple regression analyses revealed that TL led to poorer physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing. These findings were supported by previous literature and empirical studies. While PsyCap was found to have a positive effect on both physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing, it did not have a moderating effect on the relationships between TL and physiological wellbeing and psychological wellbeing. In addition to these findings, limitations of this study, recommendations and direction for future research on this topic and practical recommendations were discussed. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.title Toxic leadership, psychological capital and individual outcomes en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian NG (2020) en_ZA
dc.faculty Faculty of Humanities en_ZA
dc.school School of Human and Community Development en_ZA


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