Measuring the causal effect of women’s schooling on contraceptive use in Nigeria

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dc.contributor.author Ajefu, J.B.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-07-29T12:17:04Z
dc.date.available 2020-07-29T12:17:04Z
dc.date.issued 2019-09-03
dc.identifier.citation Joseph Boniface Ajefu (2019) Measuring the causal effect of women’s schooling on contraceptive use in Nigeria, Development Southern Africa, 36:5, 716-729, en_ZA
dc.identifier.issn 0376-835X (Print)
dc.identifier.issn 1470-3637 (Online)
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/29279
dc.description.abstract This paper uses the 2008 Nigerian Demographic Health Survey to investigate the effect of women’s schooling on contraceptive use. In order to control for endogeneity of women’s schooling, this paper uses an instrumental variable approach, with the free primary education programme in Nigeria introduced from 1976 to 1981, as an instrument for women’s schooling. The paper finds that the education of women increases the probability of using contraceptives. Disaggregating the results between traditional and modern contraceptive use, the results show a positive and significant impact of women’s education on both modern and traditional contraceptive use. The findings of the study lend credence to the evidence that birth control measures can lead to better timing and spacing of births that allow women to significantly expand their economic opportunities and life prospects. These have implications for women’s economic empowerment and gender equality, which are vital for any sustainable development policy. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher Routledge en_ZA
dc.rights © 2019 Government Technical Advisory Centre (GTAC). en_ZA
dc.subject Female en_ZA
dc.subject schooling en_ZA
dc.subject causal en_ZA
dc.subject effect en_ZA
dc.subject contraceptives en_ZA
dc.subject Nigeria en_ZA
dc.title Measuring the causal effect of women’s schooling on contraceptive use in Nigeria en_ZA
dc.title.alternative Development Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.type Article en_ZA
dc.journal.volume 36 en_ZA
dc.journal.title Development Southern Africa en_ZA
dc.description.librarian TT2020 en_ZA
dc.citation.doi 10.1080/0376835X.2019.1593109 en_ZA
dc.journal.link https://doi.org/10.1080/0376835X.2019.1593109 en_ZA
dc.journal.issue 5 en_ZA
dc.article.start-page 716 en_ZA
dc.article.end-page 729 en_ZA
dc.faculty Business Sciences en_ZA
dc.school School of Economic en_ZA


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