Towards a class compromise in South Africa's "double transition": bargained liberalization and the consolidation of democracy

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dc.contributor.author Webster, Edward
dc.contributor.author Adler, Glenn
dc.date.accessioned 2016-04-20T13:41:07Z
dc.date.available 2016-04-20T13:41:07Z
dc.date.issued 1999-09-18
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/20238
dc.description Paper presented at the Wits History Workshop: Forging the links between historical research and the policy process, 18-19 September 1999. en_ZA
dc.description.abstract South Africa's 1994 settlement ensured the survival of one of the world's most unequal capitalist systems. Liberals liked that it was based on the international economic order. All that changed was the inclusion of a few Blacks in the economic power of the White corporate elite. Change came though a conservative pact. What is needed is a class compromise which allows for engaging in the global economy but limits economic liberalisation, i.e. bargained (limited) liberalization not complete economic liberalization. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.publisher University of the Witwatersrand. History Workshop. en_ZA
dc.relation.ispartofseries HWS;469
dc.subject Politics and government. South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject Democracy. South Africa en_ZA
dc.subject Social conditions. South africa en_ZA
dc.subject Economic conditions. South Africa en_ZA
dc.title Towards a class compromise in South Africa's "double transition": bargained liberalization and the consolidation of democracy en_ZA
dc.type Working Paper en_ZA


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