Afrocuban religions in Sara Gomez's one way or another and Gloria Ronaldo's Oggun

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dc.contributor.author Ebrahim, Haseenah
dc.date.accessioned 2011-05-16T09:47:54Z
dc.date.available 2011-05-16T09:47:54Z
dc.date.issued 1998
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/9780
dc.description Volume.22, No.4. en_US
dc.description.abstract This paper explores the depiction of Afrocuban religions in two films - Sara Gomez's One way or another(1974/1977) and Gloria Rolando's Oggun: Forever present(1991).A (Western) feminist's analysis of Gomez's One way or another characterizes Abakua and Santeria as "voodoo" - not only collapsing three different Afro-Carribean religious traditions, but also reflecting Marxistbiases that exclude (ironically) a recognition that Gomez's depictions of Abakua and Santeria reflect a gendered perspective.Rolando's Oggun reflects a recent trend in Cuban cinema to celebrate Afrocuban religious practices.Oggun's stunning visuals, compelling song and dance sequences, and fascinating mythology provoke a desire to understand the role and impact of this remarkable religious tradition in Cuban society. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher The Western Journal of Black Studies en_US
dc.title Afrocuban religions in Sara Gomez's one way or another and Gloria Ronaldo's Oggun en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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