Nearer my mall to thee: The decline of the Johannesburg Central Business District and the emergence of the neo-apartheid city

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dc.contributor.author Beavon, K.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-13T06:15:46Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-13T06:15:46Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08-13
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8421
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented 5 October, 1998 en_US
dc.description.abstract Many people subscribe to the notion that the Johannesburg central business district, or CBD, has declined substantially in recent years. A closer examination of the available data, however, suggests that the process has in fact been evident for some 40 years (Lauf 1959). By the 1950s, white residential growth had already begun to bulge out to the north (Figure 1), while the 1960s saw the beginnings of a similar movement of office accommodation. Furthermore, some of the major developments that emerged in the downtown area during the 1970s, and that were intended to reinforce the status of the CBD, in fact did much to hasten the decline of downtown retailing. The neo-apartheid city that we see unfolding today has deep historical roots. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Institute for Advanced Social Research;ISS 23
dc.subject Johannesburg (South Africa) en_US
dc.subject Central business districts. South Africa. Johannesburg en_US
dc.title Nearer my mall to thee: The decline of the Johannesburg Central Business District and the emergence of the neo-apartheid city en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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