The impact of direct and indirect friendships on intergroup relations.

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dc.contributor.author Maano, Tsholofelo Cecilia
dc.date.accessioned 2010-08-12T10:11:00Z
dc.date.available 2010-08-12T10:11:00Z
dc.date.issued 2010-08-12
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8402
dc.description.abstract The extended contact hypothesis was tested using a questionnaire completed by 229 first year Psychology students. This theory posits that an individual’s awareness that an in-group member has an outgroup friend can increase positive evaluation of the out-group, thus reducing prejudice (Wright et. al., 1997). The results show that the greater the amount of contact one has with members of the out-group the lower the prejudice, social distance, and intergroup anxiety. Secondly, they show that when one has more direct friends of the out-group the lower the prejudice, social distance and intergroup anxiety. Similarly, the more extended friends one has of the out-group the lower the prejudice, social distance, and intergroup anxiety. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.title The impact of direct and indirect friendships on intergroup relations. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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