Bargained liberalisation: the labour movement policy-making and transition in Zambia and South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Adler, Glen
dc.date.accessioned 2010-05-27T12:32:32Z
dc.date.available 2010-05-27T12:32:32Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05-27T12:32:32Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/8149
dc.description African Studies Seminar series. Paper presented August 1997 en_US
dc.description.abstract The authors offer a social democratic alternative to neo-liberalism consisting of three recommendations. First, liberalisation must be accompanied by social policies that minimise social costs. Second, policies must be designed with a view towards growth, and finally, policies must be formulated and implemented through corporatist-style consultation and negotiation beyond the state and parliament to include unions, employers and other interest groups. (Przeworski et al., 1995:85) "Concertation" is central to their argument: it subjects the reform strategy to the competitive interplay of political forces, improves policy outcomes, builds support for the continuation of reforms, and helps consolidate democratic institutions. (Przeworski et al., 1995:82).To the extent that consolidation depends on concertation, trade unions are essential actors in the development of democracy. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Institute for Advanced Social Research;ISS 1
dc.subject Labor and democracy. en_US
dc.subject Labor. South Africa en_US
dc.subject Labor. Zambia en_US
dc.title Bargained liberalisation: the labour movement policy-making and transition in Zambia and South Africa en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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