Discourse practices of mathematics teacher educators in initial teacher training colleges in Malawi.

DSpace/Manakin Repository

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Chitera, Nancy
dc.date.accessioned 2010-03-01T07:15:32Z
dc.date.available 2010-03-01T07:15:32Z
dc.date.issued 2010-03-01T07:15:32Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/7574
dc.description.abstract This is a qualitative research that draws on Fairclough’s Critical Discourse Analysis methodology to analyze the discourse practices of the mathematics teacher educators in initial teacher training colleges in Malawi. The study involved four mathematics teacher educators in two teacher training colleges located in two different regions of Malawi. Specifically the study explored the following questions: 1) What are the discourse practices that mathematics teacher educators display in their descriptions of multilingual mathematics classrooms? 2) a) What are the discourse practices that mathematics teacher educators display in a college mathematics classroom? b) How do they make available the discourse practices for the student teachers to draw on? Data was collected through pre-observation interviews, classroom observations, reflective interviews and focus group discussions with the mathematics teacher educators. This study has shown that while there are some disconnections between the discourse practices produced in a school multilingual mathematics classroom and a college mathematics classroom, some of the discourse practices that mathematics teachers produced in a college mathematics classroom reinforces the common discourse practices being produced in multilingual mathematics classroom. There are three common discourse practices that were displayed in a college mathematics classroom. These discourse practices are: Initial-Response-Evaluation (Pimm, 1987), traditional lecturing and group discussions. I observed that the IRE and traditional lecturing discourse practices were accompanied by directive discourses for procedural control, and the procedural discourse was the prevalent discourse in all the discourse practices produced. iv Three major themes have emerged from the data analysis. Firstly, the research findings indicate that the mathematics teacher educators regard multilingualism and the language practices that come with it such as code-switching more as a problem rather than a resource for teaching and learning. Secondly, code-switching in college mathematics classroom is not as spontaneous as is research shows it to be in schools; rather it is very much controlled and restricted. Thirdly, the dilemmas of code-switching as discussed by Adler (1998, 2001) are more acute in teacher training colleges, mainly because of the mismatch in the Language-in-Education Policy (LiEP) in schools and tertiary level. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.subject Qualitative research design en_US
dc.subject Critical discourse analysis en_US
dc.subject Discourse practice en_US
dc.subject Mathematics teacher educators en_US
dc.subject Initial teacher training colleges en_US
dc.subject Multilingual classroom en_US
dc.subject Code switching en_US
dc.subject Multilingualism en_US
dc.subject Student teachers en_US
dc.subject College mathematics classroom en_US
dc.subject Initial-Response-Evaluation en_US
dc.subject Traditional lecturing en_US
dc.subject Group discussions en_US
dc.subject Directive discourse en_US
dc.subject Procedural discourse en_US
dc.subject School mathematics teaching en_US
dc.title Discourse practices of mathematics teacher educators in initial teacher training colleges in Malawi. en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search WIReDSpace


Browse

My Account

Statistics