Understanding the socio-political status of Leokwe society during the Middle Iron Age in the Shashe-Limpopo Basin through a landscape approach

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dc.contributor.author Du Piesanie, Justine
dc.date.accessioned 2009-05-22T07:39:04Z
dc.date.available 2009-05-22T07:39:04Z
dc.date.issued 2009-05-22T07:39:04Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/6967
dc.description.abstract Calabrese (2005) identified two distinct ceramics styles in the Shashe- Limpopo basin at the same time – Leokwe and K2. This is the first record of ethnicity in the Iron Age of southern Africa. With this identification come new avenues for research. How these groups interacted, and their relative status through time is the focus of my research. According to Calabrese, some Leokwe groups maintained a higher, or at least equal status on initial contact with K2, before K2 became the dominant political group. He bases this claim on the identification of what he terms ‘Elite Symbolic Objects’ at sites, such as Castle Rock. Using GIS, it is clear that the locale of sites differ within the landscape. Specifically, locations vary through time on the escarpment and floodplain and their relationship to primary and secondary resources. This variation suggests that access to resources was controlled, and this implication influences ones assessment of the relative status of K2 and Leokwe groups. Additionally, new excavations at Castle Rock call into question the validity of ‘elite symbolic objects’ in determining status. en
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Archaeology en
dc.subject Ethnicity en
dc.subject Iron Age en
dc.subject Shashe Limpopo Basin en
dc.subject Leokwe en
dc.title Understanding the socio-political status of Leokwe society during the Middle Iron Age in the Shashe-Limpopo Basin through a landscape approach en
dc.type Thesis en


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