Job demands, resources and the propensity to comply with safety procedures and interventions associated with needlestick injuries

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dc.contributor.author Wing, Jenna Andrea
dc.date.accessioned 2018-06-04T12:34:00Z
dc.date.available 2018-06-04T12:34:00Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Wing, Jenna Andrea (2017) Job demands, resources and the propensity to comply with safety procedures and interventions associated with needlestick injuries, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, <https://hdl.handle.net/10539/24570>
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/24570
dc.description A research project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master’s (Industrial/Organisational Psychology) in the Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, March 2017
dc.description.abstract A South African study, based on a sample of 208 medical personnel working in public and private institutions, was conducted in order to determine whether job demands and job resources led to differences in the propensity to comply with Needlestick Injury (NSI) intervention scores. Three self-report questionnaires were completed by the participants, namely the self-developed demographic questionnaire, the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS) which measured job demands and resources, and thirdly the self-developed Propensity to Comply with Interventions for Needlestick Injuries Scale (PCINS) which measured the propensity to comply with interventions for NSIs. Accidental needle stick, as well as sharp, injuries occur frequently within the medical context and are associated with high risks for blood-borne infections (Adefolalu, 2014). Specifically within South Africa blood-borne infections such as HIV carry heavy significance. Needlestick injuries often go unreported by healthcare professionals, and these injuries are widely prevalent. The researcher aimed to explore the job demands and resources that contribute to and mitigate against these injuries. Therefore support for the analysis of job demands and resources and the propensity to comply with NSI interventions exists. The results of the study suggested that there were mostly no significant differences between Job Demands and Resources and the propensity to comply with NSI Interventions scores. However significant relationships were found between length of shift and the propensity to comply with NSI interventions and growth opportunities and the propensity to comply with NSI interventions. The findings did not follow the proposed hypotheses that job demands would lead to a decrease in the propensity to comply with NSI interventions and job resources would lead to an increase in the propensity to comply with NSI interventions as longer length of shift (job demand) led to an increase in propensity to comply with NSI interventions and an association between high levels of growth opportunity (job resource), and low levels of propensity to comply with NSI interventions, was found. en_ZA
dc.format.extent Online resource (128 pages)
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Needlestick injuries--South Africa--Safety measures
dc.subject.lcsh Bloodborne infections--South Africa--Safety measures
dc.subject.lcsh Industrial safety--South Africa
dc.subject.lcsh Work--Psychological aspects
dc.title Job demands, resources and the propensity to comply with safety procedures and interventions associated with needlestick injuries en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian GR2018 en_ZA


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