Ethnography and the personal: the field practices of writing and photography on the Natal leg of the ninth frobenius expedition

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dc.contributor.author Ananmalay, Kiyara
dc.date.accessioned 2018-02-14T09:40:44Z
dc.date.available 2018-02-14T09:40:44Z
dc.date.issued 2017
dc.identifier.citation Ananmalay, Kiyara (2017) Ethnography and the personal: the field practices of writing and photography on the natal leg of the ninth frobenius expedition, Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, <https://hdl.handle.net/10539/23894>
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10539/23894
dc.description A research report submitted to the Faculty of Humanities, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (History of Art), March 2017
dc.description.abstract Within this research report, I explore how the (re-)integration of writing and photography enhances an understanding of the role of the personal within documentary practices. I focus on a portion of the Frobenius Archive as my case study, specifically the documents produced during the five-week Natal leg of the ninth expedition in early 1929. The German Leo Frobenius (b.1873–d.1938) was a primarily self-taught Africanist ethnographer, who had an interdisciplinary practice that blurred the boundaries between anthropology, archaeology and history. He conducted a total of twelve expeditions within Africa between 1904 and 1935, and his objective on these expeditions was to record ways of life that he felt were vulnerable to changes due to modernity. The documents collected during the Natal leg consist of field notes, photographs, hand-drawn pictures and diary entries. The field notes comprise of a set of eleven rock art site descriptions that have been constructed by the three artists: Maria Weyersberg, Elisabeth Mannsfeld and Agnes Schulz. Weyersberg’s diary entries provide a more impressionistic set of notes, tracking the day-today unfolding of their journey (but with many gaps). The subject matter of the photographs ranges from the rock art sites and the landscapes these sites are a part of, to the people they encountered along the way. I engaging with the concept of writing, particularly through the example of Weyersberg’s personal diaries, and the ways in which these entries relate to the photographs, creating a space in between where the personal relationships would have played themselves out. Within this research report I demonstrate that writing and photography can be brought back together in order to restore something of the original encounter and that this (re-)integration offers an opportunity for a new dialogue and a new understanding to be achieved. en_ZA
dc.format.extent Online resource (72 leaves)
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject.lcsh Frobenius, Leo--1873-1938
dc.subject.lcsh Ethnology--South Africa--Exhibitions
dc.subject.lcsh Ethnology--South Africa--History--20th century
dc.subject.lcsh Rock paintings
dc.subject.lcsh Photography in archaeology--South Africa--History
dc.title Ethnography and the personal: the field practices of writing and photography on the Natal leg of the ninth frobenius expedition en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian MT2018 en_ZA


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