The perceptions and effects of sleep deprivation in anaesthetists

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dc.contributor.author Sanders, Megan Adel
dc.date.accessioned 2017-11-13T13:58:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-11-13T13:58:38Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/23407
dc.description A research report submitted to the faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Medicine in Anaesthesiology Johannesburg, 2016 en_ZA
dc.description.abstract Background: Sleep deprivation is known to have multiple pathophysiological, psychological and cognitive effects. The effects of sleep deprivation on anaesthetists have been recognised both within and outside of the workplace. Guidelines and strategies have been proposed to counteract some of the effects of sleep deprivation. This study investigated the perceived effects of sleep deprivation amongst anaesthetists. Method: A prospective, contextual, descriptive research design was followed for the study. Anaesthetists completed a questionnaire regarding perceptions and effects of sleep deprivation and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results: A mean longest time spent without sleep due to work schedule of 31 (SD 9.1) hours. The mean score from the ESS was 11.5 (SD 4.4), indicating mild sleepiness. Sixty-one (57%) anaesthetists reported insufficient sleep due to work schedule 1 to 2 nights per week and the majority reported perceptions of the effects of sleep deprivation at work in the 1 to 2 times per week category. Sixtytwo (57.9%) anaesthetists have dozed off in theatre during the day and 85 (79.4%) have dozed off in theatre on a night call with varying degrees of regularity. Fifty-two (48.6%) anaesthetists perceived making mistakes related to sleepiness and 74 (69.2%) making mistakes unrelated to sleepiness. Due to sleepiness, 44 (41.1%) anaesthetists reported a percutaneous injury, 101 (94.4%) anaesthetists admitted to feeling at risk of a motor vehicle accident and 99 (92.5%) anaesthetists missed social or family activities because of sleepiness. Strategies to reduce sleepiness were assessed. Eighty-seven (81.3%) anaesthetists consumed at least one caffeinated beverage per day. Conclusion: Anaesthetists reported perceptions of inadequate sleep and the subsequent effects. The mean score from the ESS indicated a mild sleepiness level. Few anaesthetists used strategies to reduce the effects of sleep deprivation. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.title The perceptions and effects of sleep deprivation in anaesthetists en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dc.description.librarian MT2017 en_ZA


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