External Donors, Domestic Political Institutions and Post-Colonial Land Reform: A Comparison of Zimbabwe and Namibia.

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dc.contributor.author Mahuku, Darlington Ngoni
dc.date.accessioned 2006-11-17T11:02:23Z
dc.date.available 2006-11-17T11:02:23Z
dc.date.issued 2006-11-17T11:02:23Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/1858
dc.description Student Number : 0311118P - MA research report - School of Social Sciences - Faculty of Arts en
dc.description.abstract Land reform in Southern Africa has attracted a lot of attention from sovereign third world government and those of developed countries. This followed the invasion of commercial farms in Zimbabwe and has a bearing on Zimbabwe’s neighbours especially Namibia and South Africa. This paper examines why governments at times adhere to land reform within the rule of law and at times does not, resulting in strained donor-government relations. A comparison of government-donor relations in Zimbabwe and Namibia is explored. The crux of the argument is that land reform is damaging when the rule of law is flouted by governments. Strained relations are a result of ineffective agencies of restraint, lack of commitment by the governments, external donors and white commercial farmers to correct land injustices that came into existence as a result of settler colonialism. en
dc.format.extent 16410 bytes
dc.format.extent 393046 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject external donors en
dc.subject domestic political institutions en
dc.subject comparitive case study en
dc.title External Donors, Domestic Political Institutions and Post-Colonial Land Reform: A Comparison of Zimbabwe and Namibia. en
dc.type Thesis en


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