Music as a vehicle in conflict transformation and social integration in South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Ameck, Gillian Ayong
dc.contributor.author
dc.date.accessioned 2006-11-16T09:11:50Z
dc.date.available 2006-11-16T09:11:50Z
dc.date.issued 2006-11-16T09:11:50Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10539/1778
dc.description Faculty of Humanities School of Humanities and Social Sciences 0215594h ameck98@yahoo.com en
dc.description.abstract Music has always played an important role in the lives of mankind; the quest for freedom by black people across the world is a typical example. During the days of slavery and later the civil rights struggle in the US, the struggle for independence by African states and the fight against Apartheid, music was used as an instrument of resistance. Through music, black South Africans emerged from conscious and subconscious subjugation to rescue their psyche from alienation. Today they express their cultural self-confidence in ways very different from the generations with firsthand experience of apartheid. Conflict has always been an important contributor to music of resistance. Over the past hundred years, however, violent attempts by men to dominate each another have intensified (The two Great Wars and the Cold War, genocides, ethnic and religious clashes). In this same vein, so too have efforts to thwart such attempts. Conflicts exist at all levels, within and between individuals, communities, nations and cultures. For a society still in the process of transformation, conflict in South Africa has also taken a new dimension with focus now on social conflict (for example Crime, drugs, poverty and the generation gap) in the field of daily life also including racial conflict, affirmative action, ethnic conflict, economic conflict and others with less and less focus on political conflict. The benefit of post- 1994 South Africa is the freedom of expression it offers. This is a freedom that, 20 years ago, was a luxury for blacks living in a country torn apart by apartheid; a freedom to have pride in themselves, a freedom to express their cultural selfconfidence. The first place this freedom became visible was on the music scene in the form of new infectious, irresistible form of dance and music. Musicians use their music as a medium to demonstrate most of these societal conflicts that exist in South Africa. Peace researchers, peace workers, and others have worked over several decades to promote an alternative culture and an alternative approach to dealing with conflicts – one based on recognising the positive, constructive, and creative opportunities available in any conflict situation. In this regard I would like to dwell on music as a creative way of dealing with conflict. en
dc.format.extent 421327 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en en
dc.subject Music en
dc.subject Conflict en
dc.subject Transformation en
dc.subject Social Intergration en
dc.subject South Africa en
dc.title Music as a vehicle in conflict transformation and social integration in South Africa en
dc.type Thesis en


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