The effect of an intensive five day course of neurodevelopmental therapy on the occupational performance of children with cerebral palsy living in a poor rural area

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dc.contributor.author Broughton, Shelley Ann
dc.date.accessioned 2014-02-06T09:13:45Z
dc.date.available 2014-02-06T09:13:45Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net10539/13674
dc.description A research report submitted to the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Occupational Therapy. 2012
dc.description.abstract This study investigated the effects of a five-day “block” of intensive NDT on the gross motor function and occupational performance of 34 children with CP from an under resourced rural area of South Africa, functioning at GMFCS Levels I-V. The repeated measures research design used two preintervention (baseline of change) and two post-intervention (immediate and sustained change) assessments. The GMFM–66 and PEDI–Modified Functional Skills Scale (MFSS) were used to assess change in motor skills and occupational performance in self-care, mobility and social function over a 21 week period. The intervention included individual NDT therapy, caregiver training and provision of adapted equipment. Participants showed significant positive improvement in scores postintervention compared with the pre-intervention period, in: GMFM-66 total score (p=0.050); PEDI-MFSS: self-care skills (p=0.001), mobility (p=0.002) and social (p=0.000). The greatest gains were made in the self-care domain. In this sample, positive change was effected by a five-day intensive NDT programme. en_ZA
dc.language.iso en en_ZA
dc.subject.mesh Cerebral Palsy--therapy
dc.subject.mesh Child
dc.title The effect of an intensive five day course of neurodevelopmental therapy on the occupational performance of children with cerebral palsy living in a poor rural area en_ZA
dc.type Thesis en_ZA
dataset.nrf.grant A research report to the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Occupational Therapy, 2012


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